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Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

What is Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy disorder?

Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML), also known as Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalitis, is a rare disorder that damages myelin, the material that covers and protects nerves in the white matter of the brain. It is a deadly demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that occurs almost exclusively in immunesuppressed individuals. It is a serious brain infection that causes death or severe disability.

The Cause of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

It is caused by the JV virus, also called the JCV (John Cunningham Virus). Having JVC increases the risk of having PML. Almost every one of us has this JC virus in our body, but it usually remains latent and holds no signs of causing a deadly disease like that, but it causes this deadly disorder (Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy) when the immune system is severely compromised and polyomavirus is reactivated.

The immune system can be weakened or compromised by AIDS, Leukaemia, lymphoma or some certain medications such as Tysabri infusion, used in the treatment multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and related conditions. Anyone with a weakened immune system is at a greater risk of developing Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy.

Symptoms of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

The symptoms that can be observed on a person with Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy include loss of language ability (aphasia), weakness or paralysis, impaired speech, loss of vision, loss of coordination, headaches, and cognitive deterioration. Other serious symptoms may show as well, as its symptoms are not limited to what is found written in this article. You are advised to read similar articles to find additional information on the symptoms of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy.

Treatment of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

There is no known cure that is effective. In some cases, the disease slows or stops if the patient’s immune system improves. In people with AIDS, treatments that strengthen the immune system can lead to recovery from the symptoms of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy. No other treatments have been found to be effective for Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy.

 

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